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Volume 32, Issue 3, September 2021




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Mediterr J Rheumatol 2021;32(3):249-55
Oral Hygiene Status in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Related Factors
Authors Information

1. Rheumatology B Department, El Ayachi Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Rabat, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco

2. Laboratory of Physiology, Physiology team of Exercise and Autonomic Nervous System, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Rabat, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco

3. Periodontology Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Mohammed V University, Rabat, Morocco

4. International University of Rabat, Morocco

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate oral hygiene status in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, to analyse possible related factors, and to investigate the role of the rheumatologist in information about importance of adequate oral hygiene status in RA patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study that included 100 consecutive RA patients (89% female, mean age 46.7 ± 11.7 years). For each patient, we recorded oral symptoms, oral hygiene status and role of rheumatologist in information on the oral hygiene status. Factors associated with regular brushing (≥2/day) were also analysed. Results: Median disease duration was 8 years (4;2). Dental pain was reported by 74% of patients and bleeding by 51% of them. Regular brushing was noted in 45% of patients. The use of a correct brushing method was noted in 14% of cases. Two patients reported visiting a dentist regularly. Information explaining that poor oral hygiene has a negative impact on RA was delivered by rheumatologist to 11 patients. Regular brushing of teeth was recommended by rheumatologist to 8 patients and 10 patients were advised by their rheumatologist to consult a dentist. Regular brushing was more important in women (48,3% vs 18,2%; p=0.05) and in the literate patients (57,6 vs 31,2%, p<0.01). No association was found between regular brushing, Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) and health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). Conclusion: This study illustrates bad oral hygiene status in RA patients, which seems more important in men and illiterate patients. It also highlights poor information given by the rheumatologist.

Cite this article as: Afilal S, Rkain H, Allaoui A, Fellous S, Berkchi JM, Taik FZ, Aachari I, Tahiri L, Alami N, Ennibi O, Hajjaj-Hassouni N, Allali F. Oral Hygiene Status in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Related Factors. Mediterr J Rheumatol 2021;32(3):249-55.

Article Submitted 30 Oct 2020; Revised 15 Feb 2021; Accepted 14 Mar 2021; Available Online: 30 Sep 2021

https://doi.org/10.31138/mjr.32.3.249

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

©Afilal S, Rkain H, Allaoui A, Fellous S, Berkchi JM, Taik FZ, Aachari I, Tahiri L, Alami N, Ennibi O, Hajjaj-Hassouni N, Allali F.