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Volume 32, Issue 3, September 2021




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Mediterr J Rheumatol 2021;32(3):237-42
Clinical Impact of the ABO Blood Type in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases: Is there a Link to the ABO and Rhesus?
Authors Information

1. Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt

2. Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Helwan University, Cairo, Egypt

3. Rheumatology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

GI Salem, NM Gamal , DH El-Hammady, N Hammam, T Gheita 

Abstract

Objectives: Several studies have shown associations of ABO and Rh blood groups with various diseases; however, the relationship of ABO and Rh blood groups with rheumatic diseases are scarce. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there is an association between ABO and Rh blood groups and the types of rheumatic diseases. Method: In this multi-centre cross-sectional study, sociodemographic data, type of rheumatic disease, and type ABO and Rh blood groups were examined for patients with different rheumatic diseases. Results: A total of 304 patients; 207 (68.1%) were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, and 40 (13.2%) had systemic lupus erythematosus. The patients were assessed for blood types; 37.8% patients had A type, 27.6% had B type, 19.1% had O type, and 15.4% had AB type. The Rh (+) blood group was more prevalent (89.1%) than Rh (-). Blood group A was more prevalent in patients with rheumatic disease, followed by B, O, and AB respectively, although there was no significant difference in the distribution of ABO groups among rheumatic diseases.  Female gender, smoking, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide are significantly different between the blood groups within rheumatic diseases. Conclusion: The A and Rh (+) blood groups were more commonly observed in patients with rheumatic diseases. There was lack of association between types of rheumatic diseases and ABO blood groups. The study provides knowledge for the interaction between ABO blood groups and several risk factors related to rheumatic diseases and may serve a guide for future clinical studies.


Cite this article as: Salem GI, Gamal NM, Talaat EA, El-Hammady DH, Hammam N, Gheita TA. Clinical Impact of the ABO Blood Type in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases: Is there a Link to the ABO and Rhesus? Mediterr J Rheumatol 2021;32(3):237-42

Article Submitted: 2 Dec 2020; Revised Form: 22 May 2021; Article Accepted: 18 Jun 2021; Available Online: 30 Sep 2021

https://doi.org/10.31138/mjr.32.3.237

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY). 

©Salem GI, Gamal NM, Talaat EA, El-Hammady DH, Hammam N, Gheita TA.